I’ll Come Running Back To You

By Sam Cooke, transcribed to ukelele by chuck lin from Avett Brothers recording

Folks say that you've found someone new
G                     | G7 

To do the things I used to do for you
C               | G

Just call my name, I'm not ashamed
G                     | G7 

I'll come running back to you
C                     | D

Can't sleep at night, I can't eat a bite
G                     | G7 

When you were mine I didn't treat you right
C               | G

Just call my name, I'm not ashamed
G                     | G7 

I'll come running back to you
C         C-      | G

Just like a king, I've lost everything
G                     | G7 

I sit all alone on my throne
C               | C        | C,B,Bb 

I've got my pride, but deep down inside
A                  | A

I'm yours and yours alone
D

I try to forget, have no regrets
G                     | G7 

This love of ours could always start anew
C               | G

Just call my name, I know I'm not ashamed
G                     | G7 

I'll come running back to you
C     C-         | G

---- solo -----

Just like a king I've lost everything
G                     | G7 

I sit all alone on my throne
C               | C        | C,B,Bb 

I've got my pride, but deep down inside
A                  | A

I'm yours and yours alone
D

I try to forget, have no regrets
G                     | G7 

This love of ours could always start anew
C               | G

Just call my name, I'm not ashamed
G                     | G7 

I'll come running back to you
C              C-    | G

Just call my name, I'm not ashamed
G                     | G7 

I'll come running back to you
C                      | G

-2-  -2-  -3-  -3-  -0-  -0-
-3-  -1-  -0-  -3-  -2-  -0-
-2-  -2-  -0-  -3-  -2-  -1-
-0-  -0-  -0-  -0-  -2-  -2-
 G    G7   C    C-   D    A

Chromatic
-3-  -2-  -1-
-3-  -2-  -1-
-4-  -3-  -2-
-0-  -0-  -0-
 C    B    Bb




Be brave

This is a reminder:

I know what I want. Although I’m willing to compromise, the result must be one that remains true to me. It’s not a demand but a request. Not everyone can accept my terms but I must make my intentions clear. Otherwise its not fair to others when I rebel.

If I fall, I will get up and try again. I’ve fallen plenty of times in the past but this time instead of feeling sorry for myself, I will dust off and hop up. Everyday is precious. Don’t waste another day on pity.

I know I’m worth it. If others are not willing to take a chance on me, its not a reflection of me. There is a difference between confidence and narcissism. Confidence is attractive.

I’m willing to put it all on the line. No risk, no reward.

I’ll read this again later today
and every day.

Whats my challenge?

“What’s your challenge this year Chuck?” Dave asked.

“I dunno.”

Every year I pick a challenge. In the past years it has been: tennis, record a song,  do 1000 situps, 20 pull-ups in a row ( got to 19 ), triathlon. I can follow this tradition back to high school when I climbed all the high peaks of the Adirondacks in 10 days but I have nothing for this year. It’s been a tough year just to keep my head above water.

Now its June and I have yet to pick my challenge.

I want to say that my challenge this year is to find the right girl. But that’s not appropriate. Finding the right partner is not a challenge I can complete on my own. Imagine watching a field of firebugs. They fly around aimlessly, attracting each other with their blinking lights. It’s not one seeking out the other, but the chance encounter that brings two firebugs together in the night.

So the challenge this year: To love myself. Thats all. This year, I am impervious to criticism. I will no longer perform for an audience of many, but to an empty theater. At the end of every performance I will imagine the standing ovation. Because I am my biggest fan, and I’m already standing.

 

My first performance is a re-run. I wrote this many years ago for a distant someone. Today I perform it for the last time.

 

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Today I thank Brenda for inspiring me to be better to myself.

Gilbert Gottfried my long lost twin

“If a woman is laughing at everything you say, she already plans to fuck you.

That’s all there is to it. Your jokes don’t have to be any good, because she’s not really listening. If she’s planning to fuck you, she’ll laugh. And if she’s not, she won’t. End of story.”

 

http://www.playboy.com/playground/view/gilbert-gottfried-on-getting-laid

Best article I’ve read in a long time about women.

Who’s afraid?

Undoubtedly this video will go viral. Deb was going in for a double mastectomy. Her life about to change forever. Does she look scared?

Yes.

She is scared as anyone would be. So is her team of doctors and nurses. As they should be. And as much as Deb is putting on a show to hide her fear, she’s doing much more than that. She’s also telling her team “I’m ok. I want you to be ok too”. All surgery comes with risk. There is a chance that Deb might not make it alive but instead of letting that tension overshadow the situation, she lead them in a celebration of life. Of course there is a practical reason to do this: A happy team is a successful team. But Deb is telling her team that if she doesn’t make it, she wanted the last people she sees to have fond memories of her.

 

I thought about my own surgery in 2007. My doctor wanted to thread a scope via my groin so he could take a look at my heart. A bunch of nervous looking nurses waited for the surgeon to start. A young nurse was checking my vitals when I began flirting with her. I wasn’t trying to pick her up, but I couldn’t resist the chance to make someone smile.

So there I was, with my lower half fully exposed, I asked her.

“So, do you come here often?” I think I saw a faint smile. Of course I couldn’t be sure with her surgical mask and hair cap covering most of her face.

“What time do you get off work?” I asked her. Still no response.

Tough crowd.

“Its very cold in here”.

“Yes we keep it cold to prevent infection”. Finally I get a response.

“I’m just saying its very cold in here so I want you to consider the issue of shrinkage.”

That broke the ice. Everyone laughed and the room felt 10 degrees warmer.

 

The surgeon hovered over me and said “We’re ready to start. Any questions before we begin?”

“Just one”, I replied. “Will I be able to play the piano after surgery?”

“Did you play before?” He asked.

“No.”

“Then we’re good to go”.

 

 

Today I thank my team who saved my life.